Menu
Open navigation
Scroll Down

Stats & Facts

svg Individuals

In 2014, 16.6 percent of Oregonians – 1 in every 6 people – lived below the federal poverty level.

svg Disabled

Over 20% of Oregonians living with a disability have a household income of less than $15,000 per year.

svg Household

1 in 10 families in Oregon are living in poverty, many of which spend over half their income on rent alone, leaving little left over for food, clothing, & utilities. Give a neighbor a helping hand.

svg Seniors

1 in 10 senior citizens in Oregon are living in poverty…

svg Children

1 in 5 children in Oregon live in poverty, with 1 in 11 children in extreme poverty.

In 2014, 16.6 percent of Oregonians – 1 in every 6 people – lived below the federal poverty level.

Over 20% of Oregonians living with a disability have a household income of less than $15,000 per year.

1 in 10 families in Oregon are living in poverty, many of which spend over half their income on rent alone, leaving little left over for food, clothing, & utilities. Give a neighbor a helping hand.

1 in 10 senior citizens in Oregon are living in poverty…

1 in 5 children in Oregon live in poverty, with 1 in 11 children in extreme poverty.

In Their Own Words

“My husband and I both lost our jobs and we were unable to pay our bills. We had one child, another due, and winter was on its way. Assistance helped us stop a shut off. We were able to get caught up on bills and concentrate on other things we needed. We wish we didn’t need it, but are very glad that Oregon Energy Fund was there to help.” –Sam, Josephine County

“I am a veteran on fixed income, so this year’s extreme cold has been tough. In fact, for the first time ever, I had an energy bill this winter that was actually higher than my rent. Oregon Energy Fund kept me afloat.” –Douglas, Multnomah County

“Our child has medical issues and the cost of trips to and from the doctor have been adding up. Having the electricity paid is part of our rental agreement. Assistance from Oregon Energy Fund helped us avoid a shut off… we were able to set up a payment plan for the future and we could stop worrying about being evicted.” –Kathryn, Marion County

Become Energy Efficent

5 must-do energy steps

Lightbulb Switch to LEDs

When you’re spring cleaning, switch out a few bulbs. LEDs use about 80 percent less energy than incandescent bulbs and last up to 25 times longer. Thanks to Energy Trust of Oregon, you can find reduced prices on LED bulbs for can lights, table lamps and other fixtures at Costco, The Home Depot and Lowe’s. Look for signs or ask at the store.

Source: Energy.gov

Temperature Set the Temp

Install a programmable thermostat to lower utility bills and manage your heating and cooling systems efficiently. Set your thermostat at 68 degrees or as low as possible during the day. Set it at 50 to 55 degrees at night or when you are gone.

Source: Energy.gov

Filter Check Filters

Clean or replace filters on furnaces, air conditioners, or heat pumps once a month or as needed. Also, make sure to maintain the system according to manufacture’s instructions. Replace clogged air filters on an older car with a carbureted engine to improve gas mileage by as much as 10% and to protect your engine.

OEF_icon_power-plug Always Unplug

Plug home electronics, such as TVs and DVD players, into power strips; turn the power strips off when the equipment is not in use—TVs and DVDs in standby mode still use several watts of power.

Save Water

Save water by not letting water run while you are shaving. Fix leaky faucets, thirty drips a minute of hot water wastes 50 gallons of water a month. You can also install water-saving faucet aerators on sinks you use most commonly use.

When you’re spring cleaning, switch out a few bulbs. LEDs use about 80 percent less energy than incandescent bulbs and last up to 25 times longer. Thanks to Energy Trust of Oregon, you can find reduced prices on LED bulbs for can lights, table lamps and other fixtures at Costco, The Home Depot and Lowe’s. Look for signs or ask at the store.

Source: Energy.gov

Install a programmable thermostat to lower utility bills and manage your heating and cooling systems efficiently. Set your thermostat at 68 degrees or as low as possible during the day. Set it at 50 to 55 degrees at night or when you are gone.

Source: Energy.gov

Clean or replace filters on furnaces, air conditioners, or heat pumps once a month or as needed. Also, make sure to maintain the system according to manufacture’s instructions. Replace clogged air filters on an older car with a carbureted engine to improve gas mileage by as much as 10% and to protect your engine.

Plug home electronics, such as TVs and DVD players, into power strips; turn the power strips off when the equipment is not in use—TVs and DVDs in standby mode still use several watts of power.

Save water by not letting water run while you are shaving. Fix leaky faucets, thirty drips a minute of hot water wastes 50 gallons of water a month. You can also install water-saving faucet aerators on sinks you use most commonly use.

“Saving Money & Energy At Home”

Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy

Download PDF